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Nicotine Inhalation vapour, liquid

What is this medicine?

NICOTINE (NIK oh teen) helps people stop smoking. This medicine replaces the nicotine found in cigarettes and helps to decrease withdrawal effects. It is most effective when used in combination with a stop-smoking program.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • diabetes

  • heart disease, angina, irregular heartbeat or previous heart attack

  • lung disease, including asthma

  • overactive thyroid

  • pheochromocytoma

  • stomach problems or ulcers

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to nicotine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

You should stop smoking completely before using the inhaler. Follow the directions carefully. Use exactly as directed. Do not use the inhaler more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • medicines for asthma

  • medicines for high blood pressure

  • medicines for mental depression

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Always carry the inhaler with you. Do not smoke, chew nicotine gum, or use snuff while you are using this medicine. This reduces the chance of a nicotine overdose.

If you are a diabetic and you quit smoking, the effects of insulin may be increased and you may need to reduce your insulin dose. Check with your doctor or health care professional about how you should adjust your insulin dose.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain

  • cold sweats

  • confusion

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • headache

  • increased saliva

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach pain

  • weakness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dry mouth

  • hiccups

  • irritability

  • nervousness or restlessness

  • trouble sleeping or vivid dreams

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature below 25 degrees C (77 degrees F). Protect from heat and light. Throw away unused medicine after the expiration date.


Nicotine Nasal spray, solution

What is this medicine?

NICOTINE (NIK oh teen) helps people stop smoking. This medicine replaces the nicotine found in cigarettes and helps to decrease withdrawal effects. It is most effective when used in combination with a stop-smoking program.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • chronic nasal problems, like allergies or sinusitis

  • diabetes

  • heart disease, angina, irregular heartbeat or previous heart attack

  • high blood pressure

  • lung or breathing disease, like asthma

  • thyroid disease

  • pheochromocytoma

  • stomach problems or ulcers

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to nicotine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

You should stop smoking completely before using this nasal spray. Follow the directions carefully. Use exactly as directed. Blow nose gently to clear nasal passages. Tilt head back slightly and administer the prescribed amount of nasal spray. Do not sniff, swallow, or inhale through the nose as the spray is being given.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • ergot alkaloids like dihydroergotamine, ergonovine, ergotamine, methylergonovine

  • medicines for asthma

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for depression

  • some other nasal sprays like oxymetazoline

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Do not smoke, chew nicotine gum, use other forms of nicotine, or use snuff while you are using this medicine. This reduces the chance of a nicotine overdose.

If you are a diabetic and you quit smoking, the effects of insulin may be increased and you may need to reduce your insulin dose. Check with your doctor or health care professional about how you should adjust your insulin dose.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain

  • cold sweats

  • confusion

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • headache

  • increased saliva

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin redness that lasts more than 4 days

  • stomach pain

  • weakness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dry mouth

  • hiccups

  • irritability

  • nervousness or restlessness

  • trouble sleeping or vivid dreams

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature below 30 degrees C (86 degrees F). Protect from heat. Throw away unused medicine after the expiration date. When the bottle is empty, put the cap back on and throw away in a place out of the reach of children and pets.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.


Nicotine Polacrilex Chewing-gum, medicated

What is this medicine?

NICOTINE (NIK oh teen) helps people stop smoking. This medicine replaces the nicotine found in cigarettes and helps to decrease withdrawal effects. It is most effective when used in combination with a stop-smoking program.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • diabetes

  • heart disease, angina, irregular heartbeat or previous heart attack

  • lung disease, including asthma

  • overactive thyroid

  • pheochromocytoma

  • stomach problems or ulcers

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to nicotine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Chew but do not swallow the gum. Follow the directions that come with the chewing gum. Use exactly as directed. When you feel an urgent desire for a cigarette, chew one piece of gum slowly. Continue chewing until you taste the gum or feel a slight tingling in your mouth. Then, stop chewing and place the gum between your cheek and gum. Wait until the taste or tingling is almost gone then start chewing again. Continue chewing in this manner for about 30 minutes. Slow chewing helps reduce cravings and also helps reduce the chance for heartburn or other gastrointestinal side effects.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply. Only use the chewing gum when you have a strong desire to smoke. Do not use more than one piece of gum at a time.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • medicines for asthma

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for mental depression

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Always carry the nicotine gum with you. Do not smoke while you are using the chewing gum. Do not use more than 30 pieces of gum a day. Too much gum can increase the risk of an overdose. As the urge to smoke gets less, gradually reduce the number of pieces each day over a period of 2 to 3 months. When you are only using 1 or 2 pieces a day, stop using the nicotine gum.

If your mouth gets sore from chewing the gum, suck hard sugarless candy between pieces of gum to help relieve the soreness. Brush your teeth regularly to reduce mouth irritation. If you wear dentures, contact your doctor or health care professional if the gum sticks to your dental work.

If you are a diabetic and you quit smoking, the effects of insulin may be increased and you may need to reduce your insulin dose. Check with your doctor or health care professional about how you should adjust your insulin dose.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • blisters in mouth

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain

  • cold sweats

  • confusion

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • headache

  • increased saliva

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach pain

  • weakness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dry mouth

  • hiccups

  • irritability

  • nervousness or restlessness

  • trouble sleeping or vivid dreams

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from heat and light. Throw away unused medicine after the expiration date.


Nicotine Polacrilex Oral lozenge

What is this medicine?

NICOTINE (NIK oh teen) helps people stop smoking. The lozenges replace the nicotine found in cigarettes and help to decrease withdrawal effects. It is most effective when used in combination with a stop-smoking program.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • diabetes

  • heart disease, angina, irregular heartbeat or previous heart attack

  • lung disease, including asthma

  • overactive thyroid

  • pheochromocytoma

  • stomach problems or ulcers

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to nicotine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Place the lozenge in the mouth. Suck on the lozenge until it is completely dissolved. Do not swallow the lozenge. Follow the directions carefully that come with the lozenge. Use exactly as directed. Do not use the lozenges more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • medicines for asthma

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for mental depression

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Always carry the nicotine lozenges with you. Do not smoke, chew nicotine gum, or use snuff while you are using this medicine. This reduces the chance of a nicotine overdose.

If you are a diabetic and you quit smoking, the effects of insulin may be increased and you may need to reduce your insulin dose. Check with your doctor or health care professional about how you should adjust your insulin dose.

Brush your teeth regularly to reduce mouth irritation.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain

  • cold sweats

  • confusion

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • headache

  • increased saliva

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach pain

  • weakness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dry mouth

  • hiccups

  • irritability

  • nervousness or restlessness

  • trouble sleeping or vivid dreams

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from heat and light. Throw away unused medicine after the expiration date.


Nicotine Transdermal patch - 16 hour

What is this medicine?

NICOTINE (NIK oh teen) helps people stop smoking. The patches replace the nicotine found in cigarettes and help to decrease withdrawal effects. They are most effective when used in combination with a stop-smoking program.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • diabetes

  • heart disease, angina, irregular heartbeat or previous heart attack

  • lung disease, including asthma

  • overactive thyroid

  • pheochromocytoma

  • skin problems

  • stomach problems or ulcers

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to nicotine, adhesives, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for use on the skin. Follow the directions that come with the patches. Find an area of skin on your upper arm, chest, or back that is clean, dry, greaseless, undamaged and hairless. Wash hands with plain soap and water. Do not use anything that contains aloe, lanolin or glycerin as these may prevent the patch from sticking. Dry thoroughly. Remove the patch from the sealed pouch. Do not try to cut or trim the patch. Using your palm, press the patch firmly in place for 10 seconds to make sure that there is good contact with your skin. After applying the patch, wash your hands. Change the patch every day, keeping to a regular schedule. When you apply a new patch, use a new area of skin. Wait at least 1 week before using the same area again.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you forget to replace a patch, use it as soon as you can. Only use one patch at a time and do not leave on the skin for longer than directed. If a patch falls off, you can replace it, but keep to your schedule and remove the patch at the right time.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • medicines for asthma

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for mental depression

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Do not smoke, chew nicotine gum, or use snuff while you are using this medicine. This reduces the chance of a nicotine overdose.

You can keep the patch in place during swimming, bathing, and showering. If your patch falls off during these activities, replace it.

When you first apply the patch, your skin may itch or burn. This should soon go away. When you remove a patch, the skin may look red, but this should only last for a day. Call your doctor or health care professional if you get a permanent skin rash.

If you are a diabetic and you quit smoking, the effects of insulin may be increased and you may need to reduce your insulin dose. Check with your doctor or health care professional about how you should adjust your insulin dose.

If you are going to have a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure, tell your MRI technician if you have this patch on your body. It must be removed before a MRI.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain

  • cold sweats

  • confusion

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • headache

  • increased saliva

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin redness that lasts more than 4 days

  • stomach pain

  • weakness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dry mouth

  • hiccups

  • irritability

  • nervousness or restlessness

  • trouble sleeping or vivid dreams

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Protect from heat and light. Store in manufacturers packaging until ready to use. Throw away unused medicine after the expiration date. When you remove a patch, fold with sticky sides together; put in an empty opened pouch and throw away.


Nicotine Transdermal patch - 24 hour

What is this medicine?

NICOTINE (NIK oh teen) helps people stop smoking. The patches replace the nicotine found in cigarettes and help to decrease withdrawal effects. They are most effective when used in combination with a stop-smoking program.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • diabetes

  • heart disease, angina, irregular heartbeat or previous heart attack

  • lung disease, including asthma

  • overactive thyroid

  • pheochromocytoma

  • skin problems

  • stomach problems or ulcers

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to nicotine, adhesives, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for use on the skin. Follow the directions that come with the patches. Find an area of skin on your upper arm, chest, or back that is clean, dry, greaseless, undamaged and hairless. Wash hands with plain soap and water. Do not use anything that contains aloe, lanolin or glycerin as these may prevent the patch from sticking. Dry thoroughly. Remove the patch from the sealed pouch. Do not try to cut or trim the patch. Using your palm, press the patch firmly in place for 10 seconds to make sure that there is good contact with your skin. After applying the patch, wash your hands. Change the patch every day, keeping to a regular schedule. When you apply a new patch, use a new area of skin. Wait at least 1 week before using the same area again.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you forget to replace a patch, use it as soon as you can. Only use one patch at a time and do not leave on the skin for longer than directed. If a patch falls off, you can replace it, but keep to your schedule and remove the patch at the right time.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • medicines for asthma

  • medicines for blood pressure

  • medicines for mental depression

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Do not smoke, chew nicotine gum, or use snuff while you are using this medicine. This reduces the chance of a nicotine overdose.

You can keep the patch in place during swimming, bathing, and showering. If your patch falls off during these activities, replace it.

When you first apply the patch, your skin may itch or burn. This should soon go away. When you remove a patch, the skin may look red, but this should only last for a day. Call your doctor or health care professional if you get a permanent skin rash.

If you are a diabetic and you quit smoking, the effects of insulin may be increased and you may need to reduce your insulin dose. Check with your doctor or health care professional about how you should adjust your insulin dose.

If you are going to have a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure, tell your MRI technician if you have this patch on your body. It must be removed before a MRI.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing

  • changes in vision

  • chest pain

  • cold sweats

  • confusion

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • feeling faint or lightheaded, falls

  • headache

  • increased saliva

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin redness that lasts more than 4 days

  • stomach pain

  • weakness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea

  • dry mouth

  • hiccups

  • irritability

  • nervousness or restlessness

  • trouble sleeping or vivid dreams

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Protect from heat and light. Store in manufacturers packaging until ready to use. Throw away unused medicine after the expiration date. When you remove a patch, fold with sticky sides together; put in an empty opened pouch and throw away.